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10-Q
XPO LOGISTICS, INC. filed this Form 10-Q on 11/05/2018
Entire Document
 

Fair Value Measurements
Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures,” defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date and classifies the inputs used to measure fair value into the following hierarchy:
Level 1—Quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets;
Level 2—Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations in which all significant inputs are observable in active markets; and
Level 3—Valuations based on inputs that are unobservable, generally utilizing pricing models or other valuation techniques that reflect management’s judgment and estimates.
The fair value estimates are based upon certain market assumptions and information available to management. The carrying values of the following financial instruments approximated their fair values as of September 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017: cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses and current maturities of long-term debt. Fair values approximate carrying values for these financial instruments since they are short-term in nature or are receivable or payable on demand. The Level 1 cash equivalents include money market funds valued using quoted prices in active markets and cash collected on receivables which collateralize borrowings related to the Company’s trade securitization program (see Note 5—Debt). The Level 2 cash equivalents include short-term investments valued using published interest rates for instruments with similar terms and maturities. For information regarding the fair value hierarchy of the Company’s derivative instruments and financial liabilities, refer to Note 4—Derivative Instruments and Note 5—Debt, respectively.
The following table summarizes the fair value hierarchy of cash equivalents:
 
 
As of September 30, 2018
(In millions)
 
Carrying Value
 
Fair Value
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
Cash equivalents
 
$
225.7

 
$
225.7

 
$
223.1

 
$
2.6

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As of December 31, 2017
(In millions)
 
Carrying Value
 
Fair Value
 
Level 1
 
Level 2
Cash equivalents
 
$
91.1

 
$
91.1

 
$
75.4

 
$
15.7

Adoption of New Accounting Standards
In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue (Topic 606): “Revenue from Contracts with Customers.” Topic 606 includes the required steps to achieve the core principle that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. As discussed further in Note 3—Revenue Recognition, the Company adopted Topic 606 on January 1, 2018.
In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): “Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (a consensus of the Emerging Issues Task Force).” This ASU addresses eight specific cash flow classification issues with the objective of reducing diversity in practice. Under the new standard, cash payments for debt prepayments or debt extinguishment costs should be classified as outflows for financing activities. Additional cash flow issues covered under the standard include: settlement of zero-coupon debt instruments or other debt instruments with coupon interest rates that are insignificant in relation to the effective interest rate of the borrowing, contingent consideration payments made after a business combination, proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, proceeds from the settlement of corporate-owned life insurance policies, distributions received from equity method investees, beneficial interests in securitization transactions, and separately identifiable cash flows and application of the predominance principle. The Company adopted this standard on January 1, 2018. Adoption was on a prospective basis and did not have a material effect on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.


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